Shakespeare and Marlowe: The flouting of magic and genre

The timeless appeal of Shakespeare’s plays may owe their popularity to his apparent lack of interest in maintaining genre. His plays appear to reject the blasé conventions, as reality does more often than not, that plagued his contemporaries as well as the popular film, literature, and theatre of our current era. However, I would argue … Continue reading Shakespeare and Marlowe: The flouting of magic and genre

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Shakespeare’s Henry V: The common man’s role in history, war and politics

The selected passage is taken from the very beginning of Act 2 of Henry V. It is directly after Henry V has declared war on France, and ends as Nym and Ancient Pistol draw irons. The Chorus invokes an enthusiastic response to the story’s progression, encouraging and guiding the audience’s emotional response to the events … Continue reading Shakespeare’s Henry V: The common man’s role in history, war and politics

The Tempest: Shakespeare on human nature

In ‘The Tempest’, Shakespeare evokes humanity’s capacity for both “virtue” and “evil” on an island subject to both its own laws and the illusion of Prospero’s “art”. The social buttresses of 17th century Europe are cast aside by the titular “tempest”, allowing each character to act according to their fundamental nature. The play is consequently … Continue reading The Tempest: Shakespeare on human nature

The Tempest: Act V Analysis

  In ‘The Tempest’, Shakespeare subverts the social buttresses of 17th century Europe to explore the true nature of the “human” when exposed to the natural, rather than civil, world. Catalysed by the titular “tempest”, the fundamental “affections” and nature of each character manifest in slavery and inhuman malignance on the island. However, Prospero finally … Continue reading The Tempest: Act V Analysis